Monday, September 2, 2013

Gradient and VE



Sites related to GeogSplace
Spatialworlds blog
Socialsense blog
Spatial literacy Scoop.it
Geographical thinking Scoop.it
Spatial Education and technology Scoop.it
Follow Spatialworlds on Twitter


Email contact 
manning@chariot.net.au  


Two areas of mapping we need to work on are the skills of calculating gradient and vertical exaggeration. 
Hope this helps? 

Vertical Exaggeration




Vertical exaggeration simply means that your vertical scale is larger than your horizontal scale (in the example you could use 1 cm is equal to 1000m for your vertical scale, while keeping the horizontal scale the same). Vertical exaggeration is often used if you want to discern subtle topographic features.
To determine the amount of vertical exaggeration used to construct a profile, simply divide the real-world units on the horizontal axis by the real-world units on the vertical axis (both need to be in metres)
Vertical exaggeration formula: VE = (real world units of horizontal scale) / (real world units of vertical scale).

As an example for a 1:50000 topographic map, we can set the horizontal scale (x axis) of the profile the same as the map.

* Labeling 1 cm units on x axis: 1cm on map = 50000cm in real world = 500m in real world. If we decide to use the same value for our vertical scale (1cm = 500m for y axis), then there will be a vertical exaggeration (VE) of (500m / 500m) = 1x or no vertical exaggeration.

* Changing our y axis scale so that 1cm would represent 250m then we would have 500m/250m = 2x (read 2 times) vertical exaggeration.


 Another explanation of how to calculate vertical exaggeration?

Step 1:

You basically look at the vertical scale and the horizontal scale and convert them to the same unit of measurement. Metres is usually the best one.

e.g. vertical scale - 1:50m
horizontal scale - 1:100 000 (the horizontal scale would always be in centimetres at first as marked on the map)

Convert them to the same unit of measurement and this would make

vertical scale - 1:50m
horizontal scale - 1: 1000m

Step 2: Then you just divide the metres of the horizontal scale by the metres of the vertical scale

1000m divided by 50m = 20

i.e. The vertical exaggeration is 20.

Just remember that when you're trying to calculate the vertical exaggeration on a topographic map, it won't always be a whole number so you'll be expected to round it to the nearest one.

 Calculating a Gradient (Slope)




  • Decide on an area for which you want to calculate the slope (note, it should be an area where the slope direction does not change; do not cross the top of a hill or the bottom of a valley).
  • Once you have decided on an area of interest, draw a straight line perpendicular to the contours on the slope.
  • Measure the length (run) of the line you drew and, using the scale of the map, convert that distance to metres.
  • Determine the total elevation change (rise) along the line you drew (subtract the elevation of the lowest contour used from the elevation of the highest contour used). You do not need to do any conversions on this measurement, as it is a real-world
  • To calculate the gradient of the slope, divide the elevation change (rise) in metres by the distance (run) of the line you drew (after converting it to metres). The angle you calculated is the angle between a horizontal plane and the surface of the hill
…and another explanation
Calculate the difference in height between the two points, then calculate the difference in length between the 2 points and divide.
So lets say you have a rise of 100m and a run of 1000m. It means the gradient is 100/1000, but the numerator must be 1 so that would equate to 1/10, or 1:10. It means that for every 10m you travel, the height goes up by 1m. Also make sure the rise and run are in the same units. In this case the gradient can be explained as  1 in 10 or 1:10 or 1/10 or 0.10, which means that for every 10 units travelled horizontally, the ground rises (or falls) one unit vertically.

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Make sure you have a good look at the Year 12 Geography Evening presentations




Sites related to GeogSplace
Spatialworlds blog
Socialsense blog (a class blog for Year 12 Society and Culture)
Windows to the past (a history class blog on the Great War)
Spatial literacy Scoop.it
Geographical thinking Scoop.it
Spatial Education and technology Scoop.it
Follow Spatialworlds on Twitter


Email contact 
malcolm.mcinerney@thebartonsc.sa.edu.au   


 Year 12 Evening presentation

Go to the GTASA site to view the presentations from the Adelaide University Year 12 Student Evenings over the years, including this years on 12 August.

They are all useful to you but make sure you go through these ones:
 


A presentation by Dr John Tibby at the Year 12 Evening at Adelaide University on August 12th, 2014.
Water alternatives for Adelaide and South Australia

A presentation by Professor Graeme Hugo at the Year 12 Evening at Adelaide University on August 12th, 2014.
International Migration - Australia in a global context

A presentation by Professor Graeme Hugo at the Year 12 Evening at Adelaide University on August 22nd, 2013.
Asia's Youth Population

A presentation by Dr John Tibby at the Year 12 Evening at Adelaide University on August 22nd, 2013.
Ecological Footprints: implications for solving the most wicked problem of our time


A presentation by Dr John Tibby at the Year 12 Evening at Adelaide University on August 19th, 2009
Water Resources Issues in the Lower Murray


A presentation by Douglas Bardsley at the Year 12 Evening at Adelaide University on August 19th, 2009.
Geographers responding to climate change


A presentation by Dr John Tibby at the Year 12 Evening at Adelaide University on August 25th, 2008.
Water issues in the lower Murray Darling Basin


I suggest you have look at the presentations to revisit some of the great points made on these nights about population, development and resources.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Is this geography?


Image above: Two cultures, one place! On the Gold Coast beach


Defining geography. The place of culture in geography
One of the challenges as we learn geography is to determine what is and what is not geography. With your understanding of what geography is, have a look at the following sources and make a judgement about their geographical relevance. Be pepared to talk about several of these links and explain your conclusion about their geographical relevance.








* The cultural construction of beauty

* Controlling names

* Skin lightening





* The cult of celebrity





Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Scoop.it: To aid your issue reseach


Image above: The Scoop.it site: A great site to help you gather materials on your issue.

Sites related to GeogSplace
Spatialworlds blog

Spatialworlds website
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Follow Spatialworlds on Twitter

Email contact

manning@chariot.net.au




Scoop.it: Great for the investigation, issue studies and other research work.

Scoop.it is a way of organising your research and to develop some interactivity with your investigations. Try using Scoop.it at http://www.scoop.it/

Here is a Scoop.it I created on the Environmental issue of locating a Nuclear Waste dump in South Australia. http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-issues-1  Notice that 100+ suggested sites created by Scoop.it have been added to my initial scoops.

Give it a go to organise your research. Why not create a Scoop.it for your Issue study?

Monday, March 11, 2013

Geographical information is everywhere on the Internet



Image above: Where the hell is Matt? Matthew "Matt" Harding (born September 27, 1976), is a traveller, video game designer, and Internet celebrity known as Dancing Matt for his viral videos that show him dancing in front of landmarks and street scenes in various international locations



Geoinformation is the name of the game

Information galore can be gained through trawling the Internet for Infographics, maps, video, simulations and cartoons on all things geographical. No longer are books our key source of information. Whilst books continue to be important sources of the academic and published, most of the population, including students are now getting their information from other sources.  The Internet based sources do much of the translation of the information into the forms of infographics, maps, videos and blogs. Such translation of information requires increased levels of critical literacy by the viewer/reader to weed out bias and false interpretation. To highlight the fantastic infosources out there for us to view, here are just some. They are all concise, many visual and all easy to interpret.  

Just have a look at them and be ready to have a chat about your 3 favourite ones at the beginning of Thursday's lesson.




* Economic inequalityinfographic

* James Bond travel map
Where in the world has 007 been in his 30 movies? If that's a question you've always wanted to know, then this set of maps was made just for you

* Human Development Index: This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola).

* Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly moreprecious than oil.  Change over space
Over the last 24 years, it has tapped hidden reserves of water to grow wheat and other crops in the Syrian Desert. This time series of data shows images acquired by three different Landsat satellites operated by NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey.

A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.



Learn how advances in geospatial technology and analytical methods have changed how we do everything, and discover how to make maps and analyze geographic patterns using the latest tools.


This video is a good way to introduce the discipline of geography and the class subject matter.  While geography may appear to be eclectic sets of random knowledge, it is that spatial component that binds the various sub-disciplines as a coherent whole


Interactive Migrations Map: Where are migrants coming from? Where have migrants left?

* A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World   Want to know where the poor live? Look at where the light isn’t 

The geography of religion, even in an era of secularization, is still a powerful  indicator of many patterns of human geography.  What is the religious profile of your state?  What is the spatial distribution of the religious tradition with which you identify?  What explains those spatial patterns?

Mapping a survey of rankings from a variety of sources

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Harvesting information


Sites related to GeogSplace
Spatialworlds blog
Spatialworlds website
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Follow Spatialworlds on Twitter

Email contact

manning@chariot.net.au


 Harvesting information for the Inquiry assignment

The research required for your inquiry should go beyond the normal "Googling" process. A more comprehensive process is required which involves the fantastic database research facilities of the TSC library.  Please note that when you have found the resource (article etc) you must citate in accordance with the Harvard system. Go to citation facility on the library link to create the correct citation for the source.

Here are the library research links we looked at today for you to play with and use. All your research is just a few clicks away! Email me if you have lost the passwords for the following sites.

1. EBSCO Host databases

EBSCO host databases and discovery technologies are the most-used, premium online information resources for tens of thousands of institutions worldwide, representing millions of end-users. It contains thousands of articles from magazines, journals etc on every imaginable topic/social issue.

EBSCO Host contains:

* Australia New Zealand database


* Australia New Zealand points of view

Remember to create your folders, record the citations and start collecting materials for your inquiry

  
2. LinksPlus

This is an amazing categorised data base of websites which have educational value for a huge range of issues/topics. LinksPlus is designed to guide research and save time for students, teachers and librarians. Go to http://www.weblinksresearch.com.au/login/, log in using the TSC User name and Password and start looking for sites for your issue/topic. You may wish to put the links you find into yopur Scoop.it.


For Stage 2 Geography students
Before next Tuesday (yes, remember next Tuesday is the lesson) complete the Inquiry sheet we used today on your inquiry proposal.


Thursday, February 14, 2013

How far can we go?


Sites related to GeogSplace
Spatialworlds blog
Spatialworlds website
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Follow Spatialworlds on Twitter

Email contact

manning@chariot.net.au



The environmental challenge for us all: What is our ecological footprint?


1. What is your ecological footprint?

How much land area does it take to support your lifestyle? Take this quiz to find out your Ecological Footprint, discover your biggest areas of resource consumption, and learn what you can do to tread more lightly on the earth.

Another Footprint calculator ... and another


2. The concept of planetary boundaries for your consideration. This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs

http://www.economist.com/node/21556897


3. ...and an article on the impact of China's one child per family policy. An attempt to limit population. Everything has a consequence.



Scoop it! What?




Sites related to GeogSplace
Spatialworlds blog
Spatialworlds website
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Follow Spatialworlds on Twitter Email contact

manning@chariot.net.au



Scoop.it: Great for Stage 1 and 2 Geography


Scoop.it is a way of organising your research and to develop some interactivity with your investigations. Try using Scoop.it at http://www.scoop.it/


Here is a Scoop.it I created for the Nuclear Waste Dump Forum



Follow a Scoop it on Geographical Education by Seth Dixon.  A great source for your geography learning. 

Give it a go to organise your research. Why not create a Scoop.it for your Inquiry later in the year?



Tuesday, January 29, 2013

GeogSplace??



Sites related to GeogSplace
Spatialworlds blog
Spatialworlds website
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Follow Spatialworlds on Twitter

Email contact

manning@chariot.net.au



Welcome to GeogSplace, a blog to explore place and space through the study of geography. There is no such word as splace but I thought it would be an interesting way to get us to think that geography is very much about both the study of place and space, so why not splace? Before we go any further talking about space, place and this thing called geography I want you to just play with the following 'WoW' (World of Wonder) sites that really get us appreciating the awe-inspiring nature of our world, the world of geography!


1. The BBC Human Planet Explorer: wondrous video clips galore

The excellent BBC site titled “Human Planet Explorer” contains hundreds of amazing human stories from around the world through television and radio clips from BBC programmes such as Human Planet, Amazon with Bruce Parry and Tropic of Cancer. Human Planet Explorer enables teachers and students to browse a selection of clips that showcase man's relationship with the natural environment. Check the video clips on environments, seasons, life events , survival skills, countries, events and festivals and other BBC video collections. Here are just a few to view.

* Tidal movements under the ice.
The tide goes out even under the ice. This amazing video shows the pulsating movements of the sea and ice.
People risk their lives gathering every day necessities, namely food! It is very interesting what people of the northern Arctic regions have done for so long.

Just wait till the end of the tidal ice YouTube and click on BBC1 and see some of the following magnificent videos of our world. Here are just a few wondrous ones:

* Nomads Life – Eagle hunter
* Emptying a lake in minutes
* Tuna fishing in the South Pacific
* Paddle surfer riding huge wave
* An uncontacted Amazon tribe from the air
* Fishing in the Philippines

2. Geography Association’s “A Different View”

Geography is about discovering the world… and its complexity Geography deepens our understanding of the world Geography fascinates and inspires Thinking geographically … thinking critically … about what we see and understand.

3. The NASA Earth Observatory site

This amazing source of satellite images of the Earth has been around for a while but never ceases to engender wonder of the world.

 4. Mt Everest visual

A climber and filmmaker has created the most detailed image of Mount Everest ever, made up of a mosaic of hundreds of photographs. 

5.  360 degree view from a Dubai building

Not recommended for vertigo sufferers, the image has been stitched together from 70 separate 80 megapixel images taken from the top of the 2,722 ft tower.  The photographs were taken from the very top of the building - 200 hundreds metres above the 160th floor, which is highest point reachable by elevator.The observation deck is on the 124th floor. The journey to the very top involves a steep ladder climb within the 200 metre spire at the top of the building. 

6. New York in 360

An amazing urban landscape to view and wonder at.

7. What is Geography

A video to think about geography with.


To think and write about before next lesson.

What is geography?
What is space and place?